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Peter Sagan’s Team’s Bike Preparation For Paris – Roubaix | Inside BORA-Hansgrohe

Peter Sagan’s Team’s Bike Preparation For Paris – Roubaix | Inside BORA-Hansgrohe


– We’ve come to Northern France with the help of our friends at Shimano to see how the teams prepare
for this savage one-day race. In particular we’re gonna be focusing on the preparations of BORA-hansgrohe. As they’ll be wanting
to replicate the success of their star rider Peter
Sagan who won last year. Paris-Roubaix is the biggest and best one-day race of the season. And it’s one of the few races
where riders routinely change and modify their bikes and equipment. Why? Well, it’s because of these, the cobbles. There’s 54 kilometers of these
bad boys strewn throughout the 257 kilometer course
and they take a massive toll on the riders and their equipment. (calm music) Many teams use special bikes for Roubaix in a bid to dampen the pave. Sagan’s team is no exception they’re using the new specialized Roubaix. The cool thing about this is
it actually has suspension in the form of this Future Shock. And that’s intended to soften the cobbles as much as possible. And for 2019 it also has a lockout so that it can be turned
off to make the bike stiffer and more efficient when it’s not needed. But to give you an idea of
just how brutal this race is they even have to modify
the cars for Paris-Roubaix. So this is one of the BORA team cars and it actually has a special
plate fitted underneath it to stop the cobbles damaging
the underside of the car. It’s pretty mental. Particularly geeky
modification the riders made is to change their 39 Tooth
inner chainring to a 42 or 44. And Shimano specifically supplies this chainset to the riders. I’m not exactly sure why and I’ve not seen it for sale before so I’m gonna ask Bert who’s from Shimano to explain a bit more about it. I’m here with Bert Roesems from Shimano. Shimano sponsors seven WorldTour teams that take part in Paris-Roubaix. But I’m really interested
to hear about how Shimano supports those teams for Paris-Roubaix ’cause it’s so demanding on the equipment. – Yeah well our main support is when we bring those special chainrings, those special gears the guys
want to use in Paris-Roubaix. Mainly that 53 that can be combined with the 44 inner chainring. That 44 inner chainring is
bigger than what your standard can run as your biggest inner
chainring and that is a 30/90. – So the 53/39 is the standard chainset. – That is the standard chainset. – I can buy and you can buy in the shops but why can’t we get the
53/42 that they’re using and why do they use a 53/42? – Yeah for sure they use a 42 or the 44 because they wanna go over
those cobbled sections with pretty high speed
but try to save the legs often when they have either a headwind or when it’s a cobbled section that is more or less a false flat. Also you would look at your gear chart then you would see that with a 53/44 setup with an 11/28 or 11/30 cassette, you have a lot of gears that double up. So from a consumer point of view when you ride a double
chainring in the front and 11 sprockets in the rear you want to have as many
possibilities as you can have. Which for these pro riders for a particular race like Paris-Roubaix for them it’s not needed. They wanna go high speed,
full gas over those cobbles they don’t wanna have
a nice spread of gears because they also need to tackle the special climbs or whatever. – So how does it not drop it
then what’s the difference? – We have a build up so an
extra layer on the inside of your outer chainring
that prevents the chain of getting caught in between. – And this is only available to the pros. – This is only available to the pros, this is something from
Sports Marketing Department we provide to sponsored teams and all the teams that run Shimano. – Can I have one, can you get me one? – We’ll discuss off-camera. – Okay. (exciting music) I’ve been looking at other teams bikes but specifically with
regards to BORA-hansgrohe all the riders that
are doing Paris-Roubaix have something in common on their bikes. And that is they’ve got round
cross-section handlebars not aero profile bars. A lot of these riders including
Sagan do use an aero bar for the added aero benefit
it affords most of the time but for Roubaix they’ve switched them out. And I wondered why this
was and they’ve said that it’s because the round
bar is a little bit more comfortable, it’s a bit more compliant and doesn’t quite transmit
as many vibrations as the aero bar. So anything to mitigate
the killer vibrations of the cobbles I guess. Something we often see at Paris-Roubaix is modifications
particularly in the cockpit with additional shifters, shifter buttons and brake levers on the top. – Well we have like you see on this bike you see those two small buttons. So you can shift up with one hand and shift down your
gears with the other one. So they resemble more or less our first-generation sprint shifters which was that only
one tiny little button. The difference is that this
one can house firmware. So you can play around with your settings if you would have a light set
or dropper post or whatever which can connect with this one. You can not only control shifting but you could also do
control other components on your bike with them. But this for sure makes that
you don’t need to reposition your hands when they want to shift. So when they go over the cobbled sections they can keep their hands
on top of the handlebars and still shift. – Something you may be wondering
is that with all the bumps that the cobbles create, why
don’t the riders choose to use the Shimano RX rear mech with
the clutch built into it? We actually made a video about it and it’s really impressive how it works and keeps the chain tight when
it’s going over rough bumps. But I’ve wondered this
too and I asked Shimano, I also asked the team and
they had a good answer. Apparently Trek who is also
a sponsored Shimano team they tried it out last year and found that there wasn’t really any benefit
to using it on the cobbles. It does have a benefit but
that’s on rougher ground typically gravel riding
and real rough stuff. But for the cobbles the
standard DURA-ACE rear mech is more than up to the job. They don’t find there’s any
problems with dropping chains or anything like that on this shift. In the recent past we used
to see a lot more hacks and bodgers like double wrap
bar tap and gel inserts. I haven’t seen any of that this
year and one of the reasons is wheels on bikes are now
designed to accommodate wider tires which offer
much more cushioning. On the subject of wheels
there’s quite an interesting thing we can see here and
that is they are very deep. They are 50s or 64s and
this is quite unusual. In the past, riders tended to favor even though carbon wheels were available, shallower depths because it was perceived that they were more comfortable. But now wheels have become
optimized for wider tires that can be offset by using
the larger volume tire. Now aero matters in Roubaix, last year was the fastest ever edition and so having in more aerodynamic
wheel can be significant. Matt Hamann famously won on an aero bike. And riders are starting to realize this and take it seriously. And that’s why the whole team are using at least 50
millimeter deep wheels here in this edition. And it’s also with aerodynamics in mind that we don’t see any levers on the thru axles of the disc brakes. Now believe it or not well
this is a leading edge so it can actually count significantly towards the bike’s aerodynamics. You can actually save a couple of watts by removing the thru axle lever. And the BORA mechanics, well
they have a crafty solution. They’re actually using this
which is a drill set to a torque with an allen extension key in the end and they reckon it’s like
kinda Formula 1 pick gun. They reckon that using this
they can change wheels faster than with a standard quick-release skewer. How cool is that? And it’s because there
isn’t the little notches where they have to get the wheel over. They just simple pull it in,
pull it out, pull it in, done. I think that’s really really cool. But I’d love to see them do it as a race against the quick-release, maybe we should do that in a future video. (exciting music) You have to be a massive hard
case to ride Paris-Roubaix we know but I think the
biggest unsung heroes are the mechanics because they have to do a ridiculous amount of work. Probably more work for this
race than any other race because of all of the
specialist equipment. So for example the wheels, they have to take all
the tires off the wheels that they normally use,
typically 25 millimeter tires and replace them in the case of BORA with 30 millimeter tires. But then once that’s done, they have to take those back
off and put the 25s back on. And this is a really big job
it involves taking them off, removing the tub glue
cause they’re tubulars, applying the glue, curing
it and that takes a few days for each wheel, it’s a massive job. And then they’ve got to set up the bikes. The Roubaix bikes with their suspension that BORA use aren’t really
used in many other races throughout the year, maybe
one stage of the tour. So again they have to
fully set up a whole fleet of bikes in full race
mode to the specification of each rider’s particulars. And it’s not just one bike,
every rider has a spare as well. So there’s actually a little number on the back of Daniel Oss’ bike. That two, that means it’s his second bike. And well Peter Sagan, he’s got four. So you can imagine how much
work it is for these guys. Absolute heroes. (exciting music) Despite all the modifications and preparations the riders can do, there’s no escaping that riding on cobbles like these on the car folder lab, hurt. It hurts a bit less than
it used to 30 years ago with the equipment they had back then but it still hurts. And only the most dogged,
determined, tenacious and strongest riders will
ever be triumphant in a race that’s such a war of
attrition like Paris-Roubaix. You have to be lucky as well. It’s a very unpredictable
race and that’s why we love it because as soon as sport
becomes in any way predictable it can become boring and
Paris-Roubaix is anything but that. So I hope you’ve enjoyed this video and if you have please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to the GCN channel. And to watch more cobble-related content you can click on the cobbles.

100 comments on “Peter Sagan’s Team’s Bike Preparation For Paris – Roubaix | Inside BORA-Hansgrohe

  1. Hi guys
    Quick question: if the pros can use a 42/44 chainring and it is clearly stated “only available for the pros” does that no completely contradict the new rule of 2019 that “all” products that the pros ride must be available for the public to purchase
    A 42/44 not available should still the same as 3D handle bars that can’t be used anymore

  2. OMG…. fitting a larger inner chainring is nothing new. Why "so special". Next thing we'll see is a "very special episode" because some rider wants to use a straight block

  3. Great video. I like the fact that you took us in for a technical look on how Bora prepares for this particular race.
    The Q/A was wonderful. Thanks.

  4. A good gearing for this race would be a 53×44 up front and a 9000 series 11-23 cassette in back. (or they could just use a 9100 11-25)

  5. I thought everything used in the pro peleton had to be made available for the general public,it seems to me that it depends on who you are,cos team sky had to get rid of an item cos the public couldn't buy it

  6. With the comment at 5:45, is a shimano electric dropper post coming very soon?

    an article from last year hinting at the possibility
    https://cyclingindustry.news/new-patents-hint-at-incoming-shimano-smart-mountain-bike-system/

  7. "… as soon as sport becomes in any way predictable it can become boring…" and that explains why I've completely switched over to cycling from F1!

  8. Having used a 90mm front all weathers found the extra depth really helps in crosswinds, not intuitive, it's equal to a disc rear alone in time saved, adds about 1mph, this for elliptical shapes which don't steer you, 'V' shapes steer you in crosswinds, avoid them on the road.

  9. looking forward for the GCN pit stop challenge with a team using QR and other team using the thru axle + drill combo to change a wheel.. on a timed climb! 🙂 (Dan was quite eager to change some wheels on his Team Sky Zone Hopper video)

  10. Loving Ollie's Superhero action stance @2:11. He obviously sensed a freebie ( inner chain ring) and transmogrified (See Calvin & Hobbes) into ' Scavenger Man ' 😂

  11. Uci rules state you have to use equipment thats available to the public. Ban the chainsets. Or shimano pull your act together.

  12. Great, all I need now is my own little pit crew equipped with power tools to change my wheel faster than I can by myself on my qr setup. Amazing.

  13. Don't those fancy chainrings have to be available to the wider public in order to comply with UCI regulations?

  14. Living in flat old East York’s, I run a 53/42 set up. I feel pro now at last! just got to ditch the mud guards, lose 7kg and ride more than 20miles a time 🙂

  15. After the results of this years Paris Roubaix, Peter should watch GCN’s top 10 devious ways to beat your mate’s – he could try some on the wolf pack.

  16. Hi Team, great show!
    At 5:50 he mentions controlling a dropper post using Di2. Is there any dropper post out there that can be controlled electronically besides SRAM Rockshox Reverb AXS as I am pretty sure SRAM Rockshox Reverb AXS are not compatible with Di2.

    If so, what options am I left with for an electronic dropper post that can be controlled via Di2?

    #AskGCNtech

  17. A drill is their secret weapon ? Wait until they find out about that super performance improver instant coffee 😏

  18. Clutch rear dearilleur is for the real rough stuff like gravel riding….bwuahahaha. How is gravel riding rougher than the cobbles of Roubaix? Just wondering…

  19. The new Roubaix – £9000, the footage of Sagan with the new future shock locked out throughout the entire race even on the cobbles – Priceless.

  20. A big downside of the drill-quick-wheel-swap is that only the mechanics can swap wheels. Riders can't give their wheel to their teammates. Which could basically screw the favourites if they end up with a flat on one of the cobbles sections where the team cars can't come. I wonder what the teams think about this? Maybe a good question for your quick-wheel-swap video?

  21. Great info Ollie. How crazy is it that bora and quickstep only had the specialized roubaix for a week and I think 5 of top 8 finishers were on it!

  22. The Mechanics are heroes every race, dream job though. If they dont have a mechanics piss up at the end of every season 'Mike' would be upset!

  23. The discussion about the size of the inner ring and the impact on gearing is comical. At no point during the race will a single racer use the inner ring, unless they’re soft pedaling after abandoning for the day. The only thing that makes any sense to me is to get the inner ring as close to the size of the outer ring, given chainstay clearance issues, so that if you drop the chain it will fall onto the inner instead of falling completely off.

  24. In general the audio of on camera talent is muddy with your channel. I’m a rabid fan but I have to strain to understand the diction. (Not just this video)

  25. Inner chainrings and di2 controlled dropper poststhat are not yet available. They just trolled everyone into wanting them. Well done.

  26. So a rear mech clutch is not needed for Roubaix but might help on my local gravel roads??? Makes ya wonder.
    I'd like some full testing done on that issue-hint hint…Get on it GCN crew.

  27. Hey, was that Ollie encouraging the riders on the Roubaix Challenge over Carrefour last saturday? Thanks guys, but take it easy on the mineral waters 😉

  28. I would love to hear some honest feed back from Sagan on how well the future shock actually worked on the new Roubaix for this race.

  29. Don't UCI rules require Shimano to sell the chain rings and chain ramps ( 4:02 ) to the public if the pros race on said gear in sanctioned races?

  30. I have always questioned and wondered about the motorbikes and the cars and how they have to deal with the cobbles. Each P-R I send out a thought for the motorbike riders, the photographers and the camera men and their pilots. How do they suffer?

  31. HI PETAR SAGAN LOVED THE HONEST CHAT VISA VIE ALTERATIONS REQUIRED ON THE BIKES NOT DISSIMILAR TO RACING CAR PIT STOP EH ! & QUITE SURE IT'S THIER OWN ' COBBLES ' ! NOT WANTING TO RUIN THIER CREDENTIALS FAIR ENOUGH ! VERI SIMILAR TO BIKES USED VIA ITALIANO CYCLISTES PASCION EPIC WELL ORGANIZED NITE RIDES GREW UP SURROUNDED VIA THIS BEAUTIFUL SPORT & ADORO ! SO PLEASE CONTINUE TO OFFERTA INFO ! IT'S GREAT TO SHARE WITH NON PRO & SEMI & TOTALEMENTE TOP PROS ! HEY WELL DONE YOU ! HEY WOULD YOU LOVELEY LOT GIVE A SHOUT OUT TO AN ADORABILE VERI SPECIALE YOUNG PRO TEAM NOVO NORDISK ALL HAVE TYPE 1 DIABETES WHILST ALL SERIOUS RIDERS A VERI AMAZING MANX LAD SAM BRAND WAS PRESENTED WITH AN AMBASSADOR AWARD RECENTLY & SO WELL DESERVED WATCH OUT FOR THEM REALE SOON PROMESSE & TRUTH LOVE SOMEONE WHO GETS CICLISMO TEAMS & GRUPPO ! WOULD BE EXCELLENTE IF YOU DID AN EXPOSE ON THEM ! HEY ONLY THOUGHT REALE IMPORTANTE TO COVER ALL BASES ! YOUR DOIN GREAT SI SI SI GRAZIE AMORE AMICO LIZA XXX

  32. in my opinion (they didn't say it), the main reason to place a 44T inner chainring is to go at the same speed but using the outer cogs, and therefore reduce the chance of jamming the chain between the spokes and the cassette, or to hit the cage of the deraileur with a spoke and destroy everything when hitting hard the cobbles. I still don't understand why they don't step down for the ultegra rx deraileur with the lock system just to reduce the chain slap. it adds just a few grams (less than a double wrap) and when locked, they say it takes away only one watt.

  33. Do they do anything for the seats? I don't know if I wasn't paying attention but I would assume sitting in the saddle with vibrations rattling through your pelvis and spreading throughout your body would take a toll.

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