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Ultra Long Distance Cycling Tips | Beyond Physical Suffering: Mark Beaumont’s Secrets

Ultra Long Distance Cycling Tips | Beyond Physical Suffering: Mark Beaumont’s Secrets


– Hopefully, you’ll have
seen by now mine and Mark’s ride around the North
Coast 500 in Scotland. Don’t let us know the
ending yet, we don’t know, because we haven’t finished
and, quite frankly, I’m not entirely sure
whether we’re gonna make it. But anyway, whilst we’ve
been cruising along, on this incredible stretch of road, we thought it would be a great opportunity to actually talk to Mark, and find out some of his ultra endurance tips. So, probably a bit late for me now, given that we’re nearly
all the way around. – I dunno, I think you’ve got it in you. (dramatic orchestral music) Ultimately ultra endurance
is your ability to suffer. Just doing long lines, believe it or not, doesn’t actually set
you up particularly well to ride or race ultra. Physically, it’s amazing
what the body can suffer, if the head can just stop
freaking out about it. (steady guitar music) – So what would your golden tips be then, for someone that perhaps is
comfortable with road cycling, they’ve done sportives,
Gran Fondos, races, but to then, transition over
to those ultra distances? – So, if you’re doing,
certainly multi day rides, but you’re not racing, I mean, I would encourage anyone
who’s riding big distances for the first time not to enter a race, just to go out there and try and push themselves over distance. So, your setup on the bike’s
gonna be a bit different. Don’t try and be too much of a race snake. Your positioning on your bike, your form on the bike
is absolutely crucial, so, if you’ve got a
really slammed front end, if you’re used to going out
with your mates on the weekend on a really aggressive setup, that’s really gonna hurt
you over the big distances. As you’ve felt on this ride, especially maybe raising
the front end a little bit, getting a bit of weight off the hands, if you’re really slammed at the front, that gets pretty sore. I mean, when I’m driving big distances and it’s safe, and it’s flat roads, I’m out on the tri-bars. But anything you can do to
move your hand position around so you’re not just sit
on the lugs all the time but moving the middle, using that as a good climbing position, because that numbing, that
pins and needles you get, is avoidable, so don’t just live with it. The amount of riders who have said to me, “Really bad saddle sores and
hand numbing is just something “you have to live with.” You can really learn to adjust your body and be more comfortable on the bike. The other thing I would
say when it comes to being comfortable on the road- and here’s a great example. Here’s a road with just
a lot of bumps and loose. As you get tired, as you get toward the end of your big days, we all tend to get quite
A-framed on the bike so we end up riding like this. So, it’s so, so important
that your upper body is the shock absorber on the bike because over five, 10,
15 hours on the bike, that really hurts. So, keeping a neutral upper body, for me, is always starting with the elbows. If your elbows are
relatively flat to the road then the upper body can just
take whatever’s given to it, whereas when we tire,
you see so many riders with their shoulders up around their ears. It’s so much punishment. It doesn’t really let the legs continue to have a nice high cadence either. So, whatever you can do on
the bike in terms of form just to make it a bit more
comfortable for yourself. You’ll feel early on in a ride if you’ve got too much
weight through your hands or you’re taking too much
punishment through the road, you need to just relax
up that upper body a bit. – Okay, that’s a great tip, actually. I hadn’t thought about that. Now, what about the
training side of things? So, I mean, how do you train for something that’s gonna take 12, 16, 24, 30 hours? – Or multi day. I mean, it’s one thing doing a mega day, it’s another thing waking
up after a few hour’s sleep and then doing it again, again, again. So, whether Land’s End, John O. Groats, or it’s a trans con, or
something even bigger, it’s all about not just how
good you are on any given day but how quickly can you recover? I spend my life telling people trying to get into ultra endurance to stop riding distance. We can all go out and do temporal rides. We can all go out and just turn the pedals over zone one, zone two. But actually, what really
builds that tolerance- what I mean by that is,
riding ultra endurance is about not breaking down,
it’s about not injuring. The amount of riders who they’re
really strong club riders, but you take them for a
four or five day ultra and the tendonitis would start to come in, repetitive strain injuries. So, your fit on the bike’s
pretty key for that. You’ve felt it yourself,
even on this ride, that tightness through the tendons. It’s more than the muscles, it’s just that use from the tendons. And if your alignment isn’t
quite right on the bike then you’re gonna pay for it. So, your bike fit’s key. But training- train hard. Train through the ranges. By that I mean power
ranges, cadence ranges. I spent a lot of time doing
much shorter sessions, 90 minutes, two hours,
and then you can build the conditioning on the
bike on top of that, the ability to just go out
and do long, long rides. Just doing long rides, believe it or not, doesn’t actually set you up particularly well to ride or race ultras. – So, it comes down to getting really fit. But what tips can you give for
sort of mental conditioning? Because I guess that’s
gonna be the difference, isn’t it, between being a fit cyclist and someone who can go the distance. – I think we’re all fascinated
with the human psyche. Ultimately ultra endurance
is your ability to suffer. I mean road racing is your
ability to suffer as well but it’s your ability to
suffer amongst others. Whereas, you know, ultra endurance riding, you’re racing yourself. You’re pushing yourself. If you wanna stop, you just stop. The only thing keeping you going
is your wish and your want. There’s no mile markers, there’s no sportive route that you’re following. It’s on you so you’ve gotta
hold yourself to account. You’ve gotta be really good at giving yourself mile
markers down the road. How are you gonna break up the ride? I mean, when we set out this morning, we had 200 miles to ride and we’ve now got a pretty nasty headwind. It doesn’t bear thinking about how many more hours
we’re gonna do this for. But physically it’s amazing
what the body can suffer if the head can just stop
freaking out about it and just get busy with the task. – Well, the difference
for me is that a road race is like acute discomfort. It’s more painful but you
know it’s short lived. Whereas, like you say, this,
I know that I’ve still got 100 and goodness-knows-what miles to go. And I’m struggling with that
if I’m completely honest. (upbeat Scottish music) – We all like the idea of taking ourselves out of our comfort zone and
figure out what our metal is. That is to be human. We don’t actually want
the comfortable life. We wanna suffer. We wanna do things that are difficult. But then we want to have
a shower, have a beer, tell our mates about it. And we’re all motivated
through tough stuff, whether it’s running a marathon, riding a sportive, doing a race, whatever. We’re all motivated by
getting through that suffering and then the light at
the end of the tunnel. Whereas the challenge
with ultra endurance, and expeditions when it comes to my world, you sometimes have to be motivated because of what you’re doing, not the idea it’s soon going to be over. You know, I’ve cycled
around the world twice. And trust me, when you’re in
the middle of the Outback, you’re not thinking about getting back to the start and finishing line in Europe. It’s just too big. It’s way, way too big. That’s an 18,000 mile race. You’re in it. You’re absolutely in it. You have to motivate
yourself by that reality, not kidding yourself by some shower, beer, the fact that
it’s soon gonna be over. – So, do you break it down
into smaller chunks then, or is it a case of, literally,
just one pedal rev at a time? – I try not to distract myself from it. I try not to take myself
out of the moment. Just- that sounds a bit zen but you’re in it. Just be in that moment. If it’s bad it will get better. If it’s good it will get worse. Nothing is steady state when
you’re doing big ultras. You just need to somehow learn that- I think the other thing, we
were talking about this earlier, unless you’ve done big single day events or multi day events, whenever you start hurting, like you are, like I am right now, then you think you’re kind of on the way to injury. It’s amazing if you stop for five minutes, grab some food, stretch the
legs, get back on the bike, you can keep going. The body adapts incredibly well. And there’s a big difference between being sore and being injured. So, a lot of people, I guess if they’ve never been there before,
the moment they get sore they think they’re on their way to injury. – And what about the physical pain then? Because you can, I guess,
do yourself a lot of damage by riding your bike for such
inordinate lengths of time. But how do you know when you
do yourself proper damage? Is that a consideration? – Yeah, I mean, I do think
that comes with experience. There’s a big difference between
hurting and being injured. You learn, as you learn your
body and you push yourself through more and more endurance,
what that difference is. I think if you’ve never
been to that place before, the moment you start really
hurting you back off. But you can ride through. I guess that links really well with just how to ride endurance-
road riding I’m talking. Because if you go out for
a club ride or a sportive you leave it all out there. It’s a battle of attrition,
it’s a ride to fail. You’re allowed to finish absolutely done. Whereas ultra endurance
riding is all about, yeah, pushing yourself, but
ultimately being in a state where you can wake up a few hours later or after a night’s sleep and do it again, and again, and again. So, your style of riding needs to change. – One thing I’ve noticed,
and I noticed it first when I was lucky enough to join you on your first day of
your around the world, was how regimented you
were with time keeping. Although, obviously, this is not around the world record attempt, there is still this sense that- – Time matters.
– Exactly. If you sit in a cafe for an hour, then that’s potentially gonna be you’re riding into the dark. Is that something that
comes naturally to you? Is it something that you
look at a watch and go, “Hang on a minute, we’ve
sat down now for 10 minutes. We’ve gotta get on the road”?
– It depends. I think the bigger the group,
the more of the tendency to procrastinate, chat,
faff, check your phone. Time flies. It’s totally fine, if you’re
doing a backpacking trip and you wanted to ride 100 miles a day, faff all you want. You can get your hundred miles done. If you’re wanting to
do 150, 200, 250 miles you’re gonna have to be
seriously diligent on time. My mantra going around the
world the last time was, “Don’t ask me to ride the bike faster, “just make sure I’m on the
bike at the right time.” So, if we faffed- considering I was riding four
hour sets a day, four of them, if I faffed for five minutes
every time I got off the bike, that would add over a
day to the world record. So, yeah, rather than me- and what I would say to the team, getting on the bike at 4 a.m., if I got on the bike
late and eight o’clock, we needed to have a conversation
why I was on the bike late ’cause even if I had
tailwinds and down hills and I made up that in terms of times and I got the distance done, you’re still cheating yourself. You’re still not doing
the simple things right. As you know, as soon as you
try and up the tempo at all riding ultra, your quads
scream, your legs hurt. ‘Cause you’re tired, you’re depleted. You sort of quite quickly get to that stage of almost over training. Where I guess if you were
racing you’d back off, whereas that’s just kind of the constant state of an ultra ride. (chuckles) – Constantly tired. – But it’s important to say, if you are hurting on
the bike, which happens, it is worth saying that you
are gonna hurt on the bike as you push the distances
and it’s perfectly okay to have some painkillers, simple stuff. But as you get super
tired and pushing yourself it’s really, really important
to avoid anti-inflammatories. – Ibuprofen.
– Yeah, exactly. So, it might be the first
thing that you reach for just thinking, “Wow,
my joints feel inflamed “and I just wanna look
after my bones and body.” – I was tempted this morning. – Yeah, anti-inflammatories are really quite harsh on the kidneys in particular. And when your body’s already under so much pressure and you’re
so pushed and depleted, there’s been some good research on the fact that it is not good for you. And athletes who have suffered with kidney failure and stuff. So, painkillers are fine, but I would just stick to plain old Paracetemol or something. – Well Mark, there’s some
absolutely brilliant tips there. Thank you so much. Make sure you give this video
a big thumbs up if you agree. If you haven’t seen that
North Coast 500 epic then do make sure you watch it. You can click through to
it just on screen now.

100 comments on “Ultra Long Distance Cycling Tips | Beyond Physical Suffering: Mark Beaumont’s Secrets

  1. Not sure what effect you're going for with 'background' music that's so loud can hardly here Mark talking!

  2. 200miles in a Day? For 3 days ? Holy crap.
    Longest event I've done is only 168km. Was so painful in the trial run that I took my mtb for the actual ride just so the ride would be comfortable.

  3. jalanannya enak banget, sepi. pemandangan juga keren.
    tapi saking sepinya ngga ada indomaret. mau mampir ngopi dimana???
    :((

  4. That was a great video. However i think the part with painkillers to be able to keep on riding is a bit to much of a grey area for me. If i can't ride without using medicin, i don't ride. Unless there is a condition like astma or something like that.

  5. Did anybody else cringe when when Mr. Beaumont suggested using pain killers? Over-the-counter pharmaceuticals and TUEs aside, wouldn’t the use of analgesics to dull pain be considered a performance enhancing substance?

  6. Did a 36 mile single speed mountain bike event. I was one of two on a full ridge bike. It took me 5 hours and my legs were cramping constantly by the half way point in the race. It was brutal for me, because I didn't really train for it. But I finished.

  7. You, guys, aren't "real" bicycle tourist cause you even haven't installed fenders. I cannot realize how to do those kind of things without them.

  8. Great information, absolutely priceless, especially the part about NSAID…As a newbie to long distance biking, I’m arbitrary surprised at the size of Mark, how does he carry this weight?

  9. I made very long distances trips, from 300 to 500k, alone, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft5HeC1YT-8&t=24s

  10. Does Si use fairly short cranks? His legs (knees particularly) hardly seem to move up and down much in comparison to Mark.

  11. Very interesting and inspirational,
    Can we pls have some videos on the type of bikes for endurance (budget and med cost)
    What you need to take with you and how to pack kit and tents etc

    Loving your work keep it up boys and girls and thanks for your hard work in efforts bringing all this to us!

  12. True tips. Ive done many multi week solo long haul tours. Another tip is eat at least 10g of carbs per kg per day. 1g per hour. Drink enough so you are pizzing clear every 2-3 hours and eat before you are hungry. Carb the F up! 🙂

  13. My dad and I did a 500+ ride from San Fran. to Santa Monica. We noticed that when in the saddle, the bum was fine but when we took a break and got back on the saddle, our bums were really sore for the first 15-20 minutes. It got to the point that we didn't want to stop and rest because of this. My question is, is there a anything that can be done to alleviate the soreness during a long ride like this? Thanks.

  14. Pretty good, but I was hoping to hear what he recommends to avoid hot foot and saddle sores. What shoes, saddles and bibs does he like? What chamois cream does he like?

  15. Hi. Im currently cycling in central America, my goal is to climb the 7 summits of the region and so far I've done 4 out of 7 summits, with my old, heavy bike. 160km every day

  16. Good information! I am on my third year in the Race Across the West, 925 mile event in under 92 hours. It's a great race and a qualifier for the RAAM. It's definitely a mental when in comes to ultra cycling. If it's a supported race, than your crew is what gets you where you need to be. A good crew will get you far.

  17. The longest I have done is Dusk till Dawn at Thetford. However, I have also done a 5 hr trailquest. Other than that no. That said, I have been watching Katie Kookaburras channel and am getting the urge to do some longer distances. Only a few things that I need to work on, cadence being one of them. But looking to take on longer rides.

  18. stick to plain ol' what? could not understand.. was he saying stick to aspirin ? Appreciate the info (a lot!) but could not understand . Great stuff to know.

  19. I can relate. Doing the Seattle to Portland in about 10 weeks. Decided to break the 200 miles into two days because I want to “faff around” a bit and enjoy it. For me, being in the moment and enjoying the experience makes things better compared to frequently looking down at my computer and counting the miles left to go.

  20. Really nice video, probably the best so far!!! Wondering why you have never covered Randonneuring, Audaxes etc. in the channel??? This year is even a PBP year…

  21. I stopped racing 10 years ago & joined Audax UK, rides of 200 to 1400 kms are the norm, I changed my position & bikes, higher at the front end, longer wheelbase bikes, lower tyre pressures means less fatigue on your arms, hands, lower back & backside, good chamois cream is a must, always ride within your capability & pace yourself.

  22. Not sure if anybody has told you guys yet but you all look like shit. No upperbody mass at all, legs with zero hamstring and glute developement. Just a cheezy little quad with nothing else. And you call this a sport?

  23. Haven't done a lot of endurance events where you get up day after day and do long Ks back to back, but 1 day long distance events have had me in the area of what Mark was just talking about. It's about pushing yourself, proving to yourself what you are capable of and coming out the other side knowing that you did it. Top words from a really knowledgeable bloke.

  24. Wow! Beautiful, visually; interesting content with great information. Loved this video! Nicely done.

  25. You guys should do a video on : How to wash your bike when you don't have acces to a ward nor a hose. I live in a city (Montreal) and my flat is on the 2nd floor, therefore, I only have acces to a balcony and a tap (obviously) inside. Also I don't want dirty water running dripping down on my 1st floor neighbour. Do you have any tips for me?

  26. I toured across the US from Portland Oregon to Boston, Ma in 1982. Mileage was 70 miles to just short of 150 per day a couple times. Camped most nights. Heavy bike with front and rear panniers and a handlebar bag. Stove pots fuel tools and some spare parts 35mm photo gear food water tent sleeping bag pad etc.

  27. Great show, I like the recent emphasis on long distance riding. I would like hear more shows about ultra distance riding. I participate in Randonneuring and plan to participate in Paris-Breas-Paris 1200 km ride. I would welcome shows on this topic. Strategy for training, feeding, etc…

  28. 90% mental, 10% physical. Be in the moment. If it's bad now, it will get better… if it's good now, it will turn bad soon enough (road, traffic, tired). I crossed the U.S. three times, 65 years old. You can do it!

  29. Thanks so much for the tips! Leaving Monday on a 3000 mile bike packing trip. The longest I've ever done on a bike is 27 miles! Hopefully a video of progress to come.

  30. 40 years ago may 15-16-17 1979 I got a. Browning sporting goods hi carbon steel wheel cotter crank bike. I started for Eugene Oregon with pack in back. Oh ! Pain ! Now Eugene is the bike Capitol and I learned if paniers aluminum wheels and forged crank and forge hubs and stuff like that . The one thing I bought was a clip on mirror which saved my life cuz many times the roads narrow or a freeway. So off to Toledo Ohio. Making 150-170 miles a day on the flats was dawn till dusk and stops at swimming pools lakes water faucets and bars. Silver spiked $50 oz. And a tray of rings at a bar and soon a gal and motel and a good tanker and nother day. If yer a lonely guy go to Boise Idaho ! Got kidnapped 3 times in one weekend and Everytime I tried leaving someone picked me off the freeway twice. An amazing Basque 6+ footer …I'm 6'8" and that gets my attention . The taller they are the harder the walnut. So she said do you think you can get that bike in the trunk ? Well I turned to see a 64 Chevy and said I will bend it if I have to. Hair to her waiste we drove off and mom and dad are out if town all weekend. So Monday I'm eastbound and a blonde ski instructor so beautiful I didn't even care she was 5'6". So we camped by the Idaho. River and i put my line in the water and the next day I'm east bound and a pickup truck slowed and a six foot wife of a B52 pilot over the Arctic. She needed warming all that polar problem you know . And she just crashed the truck in the bushes and we disappeared for the rest of the day. It was hot 102° and east bound and no roadblocks clear to Defiance Ohio. Where a wall if wind 50 miles wide flattened every tree in the county. I was the only traveler moving and the Defiance paper headline picture was a bull dog on top of a tree on top of his house ….howling. that was my shot. I had a tornado in Sheridan Wyoming where the docs at the VA were removing shrapnel and i made national news first time . They say there's is the first rodeo and Prescott days there's is. So I became a traitor when they announced I had ridden all this way to see the rodeo. So they started a contest to see who came farthest. A lady from China and that year. So I got to Ft Wayne and at rhe VA again I needed a rest and food which the doctor ordered double …everyone recognized me from the news and they put me on the local and then I got a room at the Y and a hot oil massage steam and hot dip and was in the alley smoking a joint with one if the locals. He asked if I wanted to go joy riding ….sure why not. He came back with a police car and we stopped at McDonalds and a liquor store and roared around town with the siren on drinking and eating and laughing our asses off. I don't usually do this kind of thing and it was like a wild movie…well I'm big. Same size as Hulk Hogan and by the time I crossed farmland u had the names if a dozen college girls who's dad owned a bazillion acres and needed a plow horse stud. They would holler at me on the road and I would get a shower a meal and cozy evening with my new fam ! Oh Jesus ! Having fun gotta go ! Kansas I woke up in a marijuana field as it was dark when I found a spot to camp. It was hemp and soon i had a headache and powerful hankering for some weed. There is a God ! Yes on the freeway good wind doing 30-35mph I passed a bag of Columbian on the freeway emergency lane. I smoked the tires to a halt and ran back not believing my eyes. Change of consciousness please. I left Eugene with 300 hits of acid and it was $25 a sheet of a hundred so I got 3. Budweiser acid pot. An occasional perc and I was 3 sheets to the wind . The highlight of the first leg was Bonner's Ferry Idaho as I met a group and a gal with a bike rack at Gypsy's rooming house across from Safeway in Eugene….they were headed to a rainbow festival in Idaho. I put my bike behind hers and off we went. 2000 hippies screaming naked at the moon with flutes and drums and children . Nobody was wearing clothes ! Oh my god. ! Then Iron horse tour bus from Eugene showed up from the Tuba City run with a feed sack full of peyote buttons and it was off to the races. He had a chainsaw which I borrowed sawed the length of a 7 foot log and made a massage table and i camped at the fork where everyone walked by and hung a sign. Holistic massage. I had my hands on every gal there. Good thinking huh? Back to Eugene I decided I liked biking so much I would go to Ohio and see dad and brothers . As I rolled into Toledo sundown I noticed a lot if smoke coming up from the park. My brothers did not know I was coming and did not see me on TV. So as I approached Secor Park the smoke getting thicker …they were sitting on the hood of a purple Chevelle huffing fatties when they saw a dot down the road getting bigger and they are getting pretty stoned and it turns in to their big brother. So we rag dolled each other fr five minutes hooting and hollering and dad was sure I had a car stashed. But I rode away to Missouri to see St Joseph where my Gramps was born . Great grams and her mom met Jesse James in a store . And gave them a wink and a flirt . They were tearing out the stockyards from town millions if red bricks. But before st Joe….I spot a sign State Hospital 70 miles south. My sweetie since hi school was there and I turned and huffed all day. About 3 I saw the hoary old castle looming in the distance and half dozen 6 foot blondes including mine standing at the front gate like they were waiting for me. Once again Karen Myrehn saw a dot getting bigger down the road till it turned into her X boyfriend…I was a philandering fool and she said she wanted to play the field. Doing her graduate year at the nuthouse I couldn't believe my luck I tag filled her a few minutes big passionate kiss and asked her and she said no she was still playing the field. Her friends started beating her and pushing her all around are you crazy a seven foot rock Hudson bicycles 6000 miles to ask and you what ? So we were all being silly and the tornado siren began to wail. So I was stuck in a basement with 6 six foot blondes and stayed a day or two with the psychopathic murderers and the gals had them wrapped around thwr little fingers. Music Therapists…graduate work year. So off to Denver where an old girlfriend was broke down on the road…what are the chances . So off to Ouray and I was the water commissioner their in 75. So I stayed over a couple days to fix water pipes for a friend and slept two nights in snow. Army down bag….oh yeah . Fleece lined ski mask and Michelin man down coat and off to Prescott arriving Halloween night and I was kidnapped by a blonde at marios. I never even took off the mask till we got to the motel. I didn't even tell my family I was in town I rented a motel. Hey I'm psychic ! So true to form not one family member caught any of the three news broadcasts about a lonely giant on an interstate bike tour. Imagine that ? An honorable mention to the Rally In the Alley dance Friday night in Columbus. I arrived heard a band next thing a beer was thrust in my hand and as usual I got kidnapped. What a trip?

  31. This is my first interstate bicycle tour . 1979. Below. It is accurate. 1982 I biked wine country California. But that's another adventure . Now prepare for a real summer long tour may 15 ? Or so… Till Halloween . 8000 miles in six months . People offered rides. And I took them if they were cute. But I did it it happened I can scarcely believe it . Lost my leg on a two wheeler 24 broken bones 24 surgeries . Walked out 24 months later. 32 years and infection took the leg ….I even rode for years in and out if wheelchairs and hospitals . Even put a Korean engine on for the kids. Now I repair and give bikes away to nieghbor kids. It's a lot of fun seeing the new E bikes. 1987 I went in the hospital and everyone had tenspeed road bikes . Two Christmases later I got out and they were all mountain bikes and metric !

  32. "It's amazing what the body can suffer if the head stops freaking out about it"

    I'm going to eat lava.

  33. Ok check list – Suffer ✅ don’t let the mind freak out ✅ suffer more ✅ enjoy 😉

    All sorted for my next epics, thanks guys 👍🏻

  34. For experience and those new to the sport (any sports) this video contains very useful advice. Take care of the main component (the human components), you will not find a replacement in any bike shop. Prevention is a lot easier than the cure. Thanks Mark & Si. Safe riding.

  35. Endurance: Is your ability to suffer. I love this definition. Im stealing this, thank you.
    "If its bad it gets better, if its good it gets worse"… Arthur Schopenhauer much?

  36. Endurance cycle ride, Been der, Done dat, London to Bath and back, 200. Mile's, 16 hours, Average speed, 12.5 miles M.P.H.
    Combing home down the Great North Road, Past North-Holt Air-port, Now London Air-port, The road clubs were out Dooing their training runs, McDuf, Showed them the the way home, I was in great shape. That was way-back when, in August 1955. I was riding my trusty Rudge, With 3 speed Stermy-archer hub, And front wheel Dynamo hub that supported a large blazing rear lighte. I road with the West London Y.H.A. cycling club, We looked like a band of Gypsies on the move, Sometimes we would have a Police escort for week end traffic. I think, Or maybe they thought we we're Gypsies, We did a lot of miles so we were all very fit. West-London Y.H.A. c.c. A.K.A. McAlpines Fusalears c.c. Cycling Club. .
    y.h.a, youth hostel association.

  37. Great interview glad you covered the ibuprofen problem, remember it also causes arrhythmia, and as I discovered bradycardia.

  38. Im somebody who starts to run out of gas at 50 miles. Thats when the mental games begin. My goal is to do a 100 mile ride this summer. I cant even grasp this ultra ride thing.

  39. the climb at 8:45 is gorgeous. And BIG thanks on the info about anti inflamatory is bad for kidneys. Now I know why. Yes I did it and got the mcu result whacked unlike years before.

  40. The big thing that I see people ignoring is the end of day stuff, as if they can just drop beside the bike and automatically get 2 to 8 hours of good sleep without any problem. If you are going to tent camp most nights then do that as much as you can for the month before you leave. Same thing for food prep. Food and cooking gear is always in a different bag than camp gear. Plan for a good day, 4-5:00 wake up-toiletries-break camp-go, 1-1.5 hrs stop for breakfast, 10-11:00 have lunch, 3:00 have dinner, 5-6:00 have supper-pack cooking gear-set up camp, relax-read-get good sleep. Yes this has 4 full meals, yes this has somewhat short days. As you adjust to this schedule you can extend the days riding time. Which do you think is more productive, a shorter day at a good clip and energetic or a long day from dark to dark sore and worn out? Which will give you a better nights sleep and set you up for another days ride?

  41. I'm developing myself as an endurance athlete. I'm doing muti-sport, multi-stage endurance events called adventure racing and have done three 24h events. Suffering through my saddle pain is the worst thing to overcome mentally. Foot sores are much easier.

  42. Sounds like me trying to get people to just run a mile 😂 so glad i switched from cross country to cycling my mental game is on lock already.

  43. NC 500 almost cured me of my cycling aspirations……however back in the saddle now….respect to all you ultra cyclists….chapeau!

  44. In so many of these videos, I watch the presenter riding and speaking and wonder, how fast is he going and keeping that breathing? My neck and shoulders have always been my limiters despite fits. Need more ideas to try. My limit has been just over a century.

  45. Paracetamol! Nooooooo! More people die from accidental paracetamol overdose than die on in car crashes. It would not pass modern pharmaceutical safety testing.. Stick to aspirin and suffer the gastric ulcers. Alternatively, live with the pain.

  46. I like how Mark said if you're doing 100 miles you can faff about all you want. We definitely aren't riding fast enough for faffing on a century day #slowcyclistsunite 😂 . Great lesson there about it all being in your head though. So true. On long tours you have to stay in the moment and just BE with whatever is happening. Awesome content from GCN as usual!

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